Chris Rattue: Fight on? Shane needs head examined

by Chris Rattue


Far be it from me to suggest here that boxer Shane Cameron should retire.It's a free world, and if the Mountain Warrior wants to be dribbling soup down his chin at 50 while trying to remember where he lives, that's his choice. He's also a fondly regarded part of the New Zealand sporting landscape, with an army of fans still willing him on one presumes, even if sporadic claims about his world title pedigree have erred on the side of complete and utter fantasy (what's boxing without spit buckets full of hyperbole, even in this little corner of the pugilistic world?).If Cameron wants to review the tape for a glimpse at his future, he can forget about what occurred against Brian Minto two days ago. The tape that matters is Cameron's 2009 Fight of the Century (another marvellous example of boxing extravagance) against David Tua, who pinged Cameron's head with a rapidity to match Woody Woodpecker dealing to timber.Bang, bang, bang, BANG, bang, bang, BANG, bang ... it still induces an awful wince thinking about it.There can't be many times when a puncher as lethal as Tua has landed such a quick succession of blows without the referee stepping in or the canvas rising up to claim the victim earlier.No one should dare suggest Cameron escaped at least some irreversible damage that horrific night, damage that further bouts exacerbate but will only emerge later.

Not that a wimp with a keyboard knows but hell, let's push out the boat and claim that Cameron hasn't been the same fighter since. But good ol' Mountain and his Mountain Men were still talking the talk leading up to the Minto moment, about how strong Cameron felt, his knockout punch, how Cameron could destroy people. Yippee.Boxing - what a conundrum. Absolutely love it sometimes, can't bear to watch on others. Nothing in sporting luck will match the day I sat with American heavyweight legend Joe Frazier, alone with a childhood hero who - all those years ago - came from a world that was more like another planet. The trouble being, one of the most courageous men to enter through the ropes was virtually impossible to understand. (A TV documentary involving Frazier gave him subtitles.) A handler pleaded that Frazier's speech was affected by a car accident. That explains it.Sounds of silence This is what should really worry the Wellington Phoenix - their horrific start to the A-league season is being greeted with a yawn. Nine games, no wins, after a defeat to Brisbane in Wellington. Carlos Hernandez aside, there isn't much classy hope on offer. Ernie Merrick's velvet revolution is at the foot of the table.

Only one of this country's teams commands a public reaction to indicate all is well - the All Blacks even get bagged (slightly criticised in an analytical way) when they win. This should please Steve Tew and co, although it probably doesn't.Our cricketers are an anomaly. The game is so small here you could hold tests on a village green, and to prove the point we do. The public simply doesn't have the energy to fire up for every bad performance or inexplicable decision. Using the talkback barometer, our cricketers can still light up the board though.Elsewhere, the silence is deafening. For example: Kiwi league losses, really bad ones, come and go and most people don't give a stuff. Kiwi teams laden with NRL talent are routinely smashed by Australia, including when they have been on an amazing journey developing an incredible team culture to defend their precious world crown. And boy, you need to understand what Sonny Bill Williams brings to the group.Buried in a Sunday newspaper was the prediction that Steve Kearney would almost certainly keep his Kiwis coaching job. The New Zealand Rugby League's Phil Holden likened this to the rugby situation which culminated in The Amazing Graham Henry World Cup Miracle.

One hates to be a smarty pants but there are a few differences, like ... oh, I can't be bothered.Acclaim our cricketersCongratulations to the Kiwi cricketers, for an outstanding win over perhaps the worst and most gutless West Indian team to have waved a bat without anger on these shores. The tourists have little technique, application or heart. The New Zealand Cricket number-crunchers, robbed of a weekend crowd at the Basin Reserve, will be quietly cursing the Collapso Kings. But it was still terrific to bask in an excellent all-round New Zealand cricket performance and Trent Boult's wonder catch was thrilling. There have been periods when fielding was New Zealand cricket's calling card. This aspect may have emerged in the team which drew a long series in the Caribbean in the early 70s. Forty years on, the Windies would kill for blokes who were spare parts then. For sports fans of a certain age, it is weird to watch the Windies without a scary fast bowler. No offence, but Darren Sammy at first change feels like a practical joke.

Cameron vanquished in Fight for Life comeback
Shane "Mountain Warrior" Cameron's career hangs in the balance after his loss to American Brian Minto.In the main fight on tonight's card at Waitakere Trusts Stadium, the plucky Kiwi returned from almost a year on the sidelines in an attempt to resurrect his heavyweight career, but came up against a tough and canny opponent, who found a weakness and exploited it to the end.Eventually, trainer Ken Reinsfield persuaded his charge to call it a night after the seventh of 12 scheduled rounds, as Minto continued to pound a cut over Cameron's left eye."He couldn't see out of that eye," said Reinsfield. "He was only going to do more damage."Probably still rusty from his long layoff, Cameron was behind from the start, but crept back into the contest when referee Lance Revill docked two points off Minto for illegally working the cut with his elbows and head.

By the seventh round, ringside doctors were examining the injury closely and sent Cameron out with a warning that he had just three minutes to effect a victory.He couldn't do it."It was just one of those bad nights at the office," said Cameron afterwards."I was confident of beating Brian, but he was confident of beating me and he came away with it."I trained hard, but it wasn't enough tonight."Unlike longtime rival David Tua just a few weeks ago, Cameron stopped short of drawing the curtain on his career."I'm not making any decisions at the moment. I look forward to having a good Christmas and I've got a baby coming in January."Meanwhile, the result means Minto will return to New Zealand, with a possible encounter lined up against promising Kiwi heavyweight Joseph Parker."I've definitely been promised two more fights, so I'll be back in March and then in June or July," he said. "I love it here - Kiwis are great people." That could cause a dilemma for trainer Kevin Barry, who guided Minto to success in this outing, but is also the mastermind behind Parker's burgeoning career."It's a little bit early to say," cautioned Barry

. "One thing I can say is that Brian Minto will be back in New Zealand fighting."In other fights, Aussie leagues stars Paul Gallen and Sam Thaiday both won split decisions over rugby rivals Liam Messam and Ben Tameifuna, Chris Cairns defeated former Black Caps team-mate Simon Doull on points and media lightweights Steve McIvor and Steve Kilgallon battled to a draw. 

Brian Minto (US) beats Shane Cameron (NZ) by TKO12 x 3 minute roundsWBO Oriental Heavyweight Title

Round One: Both fighters sounding each other, but Minto coming forward and looks to connect more often early.
Round Two: Minto is landing some big shots on Cameron, who is just hanging on at this point.
Round Three: Cameron is starting to fight back. Maybe he just needed a couple of blows to the beak after his long layoff ... he rocks Minto mid round and the American ties him up to minimise the damage, but Cameron has a cut over the left eye.
Round Four:  Minto comes back, trying to work over that cut. He's hurting Cameron again.
Round Five: Referee Lance Revill takes a point off Minto for throwing an elbow and trainer Kevin Barry calls him over to tape up his glove for a breather. Cameron is bleeding, but he catches Minto in the final minute of this round.
Round Six: Revill takes another point, as Minto is working that cut with his elbow and head. But he's also connecting cleanly and Cameron may be struggling to see the punches coming.
Round Seven: The doctors are looking closely at Cameron's cut and this may be the last round, either way. Minto is still connecting cleanly.Yep, that's it ... Cameron's trainer Ken Reinsfield tells his fighter he must stop. This means Minto now looms as a future opponent for Joseph Parker.


Boxing: Cameron's career teeters
By Andrew Alderson


Shane Cameron might have lost more than his fight for the WBO Oriental heavyweight title to Brian Minto last night; his career might have ended with it.Cameron suffered a technical knock-out before the start of the eighth round due to a cut inflicted above his right eye. His corner called off the bout. The cut has been troublesome before - Cameron's even had plastic surgery to grind away some of the sharper bone - but it returned to haunt him.It was 36-year-old Cameron's fourth loss in 30 professional fights; it was 38-year-old Minto's 39th win in 46.Minto, who's under the tutelage of Kevin Barry, swarmed in close to Cameron and peppered the vulnerable skin until it took its toll.Visiting a fight night always reinforces how unforgiving three minutes is. 

Cameron had to deal with a full 1260 seconds distant run over the seven rounds.He delivered his share of brutality back at an elusive Minto but the American was workmanlike and repetitive in his work on Cameron's face. Sideways glances were cast when he appeared to elbow the Mountain Warrior's mug in the fifth round. He lost a point. He lost another in the following round for a headbutt but both instances wouldn't have influenced the result.Cameron's guard slipped further as the bout wore on, like one of those Guess Who pictures that reveal the candidate's face piece-by-piece. The persistent jabbing must have tortured the Kiwi; the crowd witnessed a gruelling slow-mo between rounds as the blows rained on Cameron's face as if it was a reverberating rubber mask. Cameron clinched to save himself.An increasingly boisterous crowd started to heckle: "C'mon Cameron", "Smash him", "What are ya". Police loomed at the door.Cameron was never lacking courage. As he said: "It was a bad night at the office. The cuts made it difficult to see".He couldn't give a verdict on his future."I'll have a good break and focus on my fitness business."His trainer Ken Reinsfield was pensive in the corridor afterwards.

"He's such a warrior, but if you can't see, you can't defend yourself."He still loves the game but it's hard to have the [retirement] conversation after such a brutal fight. We'll have it in a few days when we're thinking clearer. This is gut-wrenching. I love that guy like a brother. It was hard to watch. Unfortunately that cut above the eye was an old one. He's always had trouble with his skin."[Minto] used all the advantages he could. He fought to his strengths and won. He was a good smotherer, better than anticipated.""I think that was the wrong fight [for Cameron] to come back to after a year off," Minto said."He ain't getting better, he's taking blows every fight, he's got a baby coming and he's been successful in the sport, so maybe it's time to find something else. He doesn't want to end up with a brain injury."Minto said his elbow to Cameron's head was unintentional: "I was trying to get on the inside and create room.""Shane's grabbing and holding made Brian get in closer to free his hands and be more aggressive," said Minto's trainer Barry."I thought Shane would box more than he did. They eventually just traded punches which is Brian's type of fight."Minto indicated he'd be keen to fight Joseph Parker in future."If there's a good, solid retirement fund waiting for me then I'm in."

- Herald on Sunday


Boxing: Cameron's career falters

By Andrew Alderson


Shane Cameron's professional boxing career is awkwardly poised after a cut ended a storming fight with US heavyweight Brian "The Beast" Minto in the headline bout at the Woodstock Fight For Life last night.The 38-year-old Minto was always going to be a difficult opponent for Cameron, 36, who had not fought for a year since his world IBO cruiserweight title fight in Australia, where he lost to Danny Green.There was a lot hinging on this fight for both boxers. Cameron is now New Zealand boxing's senior pro with the retirement of David Tua and the financial potential of a bout between Cameron and rising heavyweight star Joseph Parker has been evident for some time.With this loss to Minto, Cameron's move back into the ranks of more credible heavyweights has been halted. That may suggest the "Young Pretender" (Parker) versus "Senior Pro" (Cameron) bout may have an even better chance of happening after this loss.

This is not the first time Cameron has been stopped by a cut, this one suffered in round three. It was a typically brave effort by Cameron who fought hard in the next three rounds before the cut intervened, Cameron not coming out for round eight of the scheduled 12-rounder.Minto is a brawler and puncher and, while at the smaller end of the heavyweight scales, he was clearly the bigger and more powerfully built of the two men. His power opened up the cut and he worked on it hard enough so that Cameron appeared to have difficulty seeing the punches coming at the end.Minto also badly needed a win. His best-known scalp was that of Axel Schultz, the well-performed German heavyweight who fought world champions George Foreman, Michael Moorer, Wladimir Klitschko and Lennox Lewis' world title challenger, Henry Akinwande. Schultz was 38 at the time Minto met him and had been out of the ring for seven years following his loss to Klitchsko.

A strong performance and TKO by Minto sent him immediately back into retirement.However, that was in 2006 and Minto has since lost five of his last eight fights, some to credentialled boxers. One of those defeats was to serious heavyweight contender Chris Arreola (who fought Vitali Klitschko for the WBC world title in 2009, immediately before his bout with Minto).So both fighters needed the win to perk up sagging records.Cameron said before the fight he was under no illusions as to what a loss could do to his aspirations. Talking of his fights with David Tua and Monte Barrett, he said: "Monte hasn't fought since he lost to me. This is a brutal sport that we are in. One punch can change the whole fight. I've had it done to me and I've done it to other people."There is little doubt Parker is still waiting in the wings. Promoters Duco worked with Cameron's connections to find Minto as an opponent for Fight For Life; they also handle Parker. Parker's trainer Kevin Barry was in Minto's corner for this fight.Parker's next opponent in March, Brazilian and South American heavyweight champion George Arias, seems tailor-made as a warm-up for Cameron. Like Cameron, the Brazilian is a durable opponent, he's 39, 1.81m and about 100kg - similar dimensions to Cameron.

​- Herald on Sunday


Cameron's career at crossroads after defeat

 LIAM NAPIER


Standing outside the changing room as an emotional Shane Cameron prepared for another repair job on his battered face, it wasn't the time or place to talk retirement.But last night's crippling one-sided seventh round TKO loss to American brawler Brain Minto seems the logical end of the roadSure, the prospect of a squaring off against rising Kiwi heavyweight Joseph Parker remains a lucrative possibility. But after taking on South American champion George Arias in March, Parker's path may now lead to Minto, who has now been promised two more fights in New Zealand next year.With his first son due in January, Cameron will realise there is more to life than boxing. He has already taken some serious punishment. That's the nature of his style and this sport.Unlike others, though, the 36-year-old has options. A successful business - a gym on Auckland's North Shore - his long-term health and family will now be strong considerations.It's not for you, I, or anyone else to say this is it.Only Cameron can call time on his 33 fight pro career that's now featured four losses. Coming to grips with such a chapter-closing decision is brutal for any sportsman. None more so than in this lonesome, individual combat arena where the fire must burn deep within.  

 After being at his side for the best part of a decade, manager Ken Reinsfield hinted this could be the end.While Cameron received stitches on two cuts - one opened by Minto's powerful hooks, one from his illegal elbow in the fifth round - Reinsfield attempted to covey the feelings of his fighter while, for now at least, doing his best to avoid the retirement subject."It's gut-wrenching to be honest," Reinsfield said. "I love that guy like a brother. It's really hard to watch."We've got to sit down and have a chat about the future. I know he still loves the game. It's very hard to have that conversation right after a brutal fight like that. We'll probably have that chat in a few days when the dust settles and you can think clearly, not when you're emotional."We'll take it one day at a time. He's got a baby on the way. That's the focus."He's had 33 pro fights and a lot of tough ones. He's certainly done a lot for boxing in New Zealand. He's been ranked sixth in the world as a heavyweight and fought for a world title at cruiserweight. He deserves to be up there with the best in the country.

"Saying enough wasn't a hard call for Reinsfield. He recently presided over Daniel MacKinnon's defeat to Robbie Berridge. That bloody battle saw MacKinnon dye for 40 seconds and need surgery to stop a bleed on the brain.So with Cameron bleeding profusely from the third round onwards - as he's done countless times throughout his career - unable to see and protect himself, Reinsfield knew there was only one option."He wanted to keep going but they put their trust in the corner to make the decision for them," he said. "I've been through some really bad stuff in recent times. I don't want to see that happen again. If a guy can't see it's hard for him to defend himself."An awkward spoiling fighter to counter, Minto didn't present any surprises. He was just better than Cameron's camp expected. Much better."He did exactly what we thought he'd do but he was very good at smothering, better than we anticipated," Reinsfield said.  "At the end of the day we selected him. Brain Minto is no mug. He's a world ranked fighter and Shane needs to beat these guys to get that next shot. He could take another year or two battling away taking fights, but he decided to have a crack at a tough one and it didn't work out for him. He still fought like a Warrior."

- © Fairfax NZ News

​Minto TKOs Cameron in seven

By Ray Wheatley — World of Boxing


American heavyweight Brian “The Beast” Minto (39-7, 25 KOs) upset Kiwi hero Shane “Mountain Warrior” Cameron (29-4, 22 KOs) winning by seventh round TKO on Saturday night at the Trust Stadium in Auckland, New Zealand. As expected, both fighters went right at each other from the opening bell with Minto having the upper hand. Cameron’s best round was the third when he had Minto holding on. Minto regained the upper hand in the fourth when he cut Cameron over the left eye with a punch. Minto, an aggressive in-fighter, was deducted a point in round four for an elbow and another in round five for a headbutt, but he punished Cameron in rounds six and seven. Cameron remained on his stool after round seven. 

Minto, who hails from Butler, Pennsylvania, claimed the vacant WBO Oriental heavyweight title.After the fight Minto said he was promised two more fights in New Zealand and stated he’ll be back in March and then in June or July, possibly against highly regarded Joseph Parker (7-0, 6 KOs). Regarding Cameron’s 13-month layoff before the fight, Minto commented, “When you’re out of the ring it’s a different atmosphere. I could see the look on his face when he came in the ring, there was a lot of anxiety. I was just in the ring about four weeks ago, so it makes a difference when you’re more active. You can’t just come back in the sport and fight a guy like me as a tune up fight. It just doesn’t work.”


Brian Minto beats Shane Cameron by TKO 

DUNCAN JOHNSTONE


Shane Cameron's boxing career is on the ropes after he was beaten by American journeyman Brian Minto in their heavyweight clash that headlined the Fight For Life boxing event in West Auckland tonight.Minto scored a TKO when the fight was stopped after the seventh round with  Cameron's corner conceding their man was unable to continue because of cuts over both eyes.

Minto won the WBO Oriental heavyweight title with this victory.The 36-year-old Cameron, on the comeback from his cruiserweight world title loss to Australian Danny Green in November last year, never looked comfortable against the confrontational style of Minto.The 38-year-old veteran was in Cameron's face from the outset, producing the double cuts to a fighter who has had a long history of bleeding.Minto was deducted a point in the fifth round for illegal use of an elbow and another point in the following round for a headbutt. They contributed to the damage but that was never going to change the course of the result.Minto landed repeated clean, heavy blows to drain Cameron.Cameron looked rusty. Returning to his more comfortable weight division, he never got his jab going to keep the relentless Minto at bay.There was a feeling that had the fight gone on Minto would have won by distance or legitimate stoppage.

He was the more aggressive fighter on the night and deserved his win over the brave Cameron.Just where Cameron goes from here remains to be seen. This could well be the end.On top of David Tua's recent retirement, Joseph Parker now looks like the man in the heavyweight division.His trainer Kevin Barry was in Minto's corner last night and had his fighter well tuned.Minto said he would welcome a battle with Parker. "I'd love to fight Parker," Minto said.Barry said Minto wasn't a dirty fighter, it was more about his style."That's how Brian fights, he fights close and aggressive," Barry said.Minto said nothing was intentional and he felt he was a good chance to win this fight from the outset given Cameron's comparative inactivity over the last couple of years.Cameron wasn't making any excuses. He put too much pressure on me and the cuts came at a difficult time," Cameron said.The loss was Cameron's fourth in 30 fights.Cameron said he wouldn't rush any decisions over is career. 

​- © Fairfax NZ News


Weights from Auckland, New ZealandBy Ray Wheatley — World of Boxing
Shane Cameron 218.6 vs. Brian Minto 211.6(Vacant WBO Oriental heavyweight title)Sam Thaiday 249.1 vs. Ben Tameifuna 317Venue: The Trusts Stadium, Auckland, New ZealandPromoter: Duco Events

Losing bout not an option for Shane Cameron
LIAM NAPIER


Shane Cameron pauses to consider the significance Brian Minto poses. He doesn't need long. Falling at the first step in his final crack at the heavyweight division isn't an option tonight.For him, this Fight for Life is hit or bust."I can't lose to this guy," Cameron admits."If I do, I'll have to reconsider what I'm going to do. I haven't really thought about it too much, enough to drive me and keep me training hard. If I can't beat Brian Minto there's something wrong."Indeed, a loss would, essentially, lead to one option. Joseph Parker.For now, though, that fight is not on Cameron's radar. Not yet. 

No boxer enters the ring with defeat foremost in mind.Then again Cameron isn't most fighters. After 12 months out of the ring most would opt for an easy win against a second-rate opponent to build momentum.At this stage of his career Cameron (29-3) feels he doesn't have that luxury. He wants, and needs, to gain some impetus; to make a statement.A manufactured path doesn't suit his personality. He's never chosen the easy route. In tough American brawler Minto (38-7) Cameron has plotted a resumption carrying real risks and, with the WBO Oriental title and top 15 ranking on offer, real rewards and recognition."Kudos to him for taking a genuine comeback fight," Minto said."Most guys will take a tune-up just to get a win. It makes a statement as to where you're at in your career. If you can't win then ... "David Tua's sudden retirement stuck Cameron. The pair have long formed the backbone of New Zealand boxing. At 36, Cameron is now more conscious than ever of not stagnating."It's an important time for me with David retiring," he said."David's been a great champion for the New Zealand public longer than me. He's got a massive fan base. I want to try and continue that as long as I can, so I need to win.

"While he comes off a cruiserweight world title loss to Danny Green, many forget Cameron's last performance in the division of giants was his best.Monte Barrett, the American who crippled Tua's career, lay on the canvas for over a minute after Cameron's thundering right hand.There were other, bigger opportunities to fight at cruiserweight. But here, at 99kg, Cameron feels mobile, strong and fast. This is just the second time he's fought at his natural weight. Here is most comfortable."I don't care if Brian was six-foot-eight, I'd still be the same weight."Plenty has been made of Cameron's ring rust. Little of the fact he never stopped training in cross fit sessions at his Birkenhead gym.Eight weeks ago when he slipped back into sparring - four weeks earlier than a normal camp - rust was evident. Shots were taken in order to regain timing, get his eye in and stabilise defence."They seem to think me being out of the ring will play into their hands," he said."I don't believe that. After a couple of weeks I was back in my stride."Minto presents no surprises. He'll come at Cameron from the opening bell."I don't believe this fight will go the distance," Minto said. "Be prepared for a good battle."That aggressive approach also offers openings. If Cameron can be patient and time his counter punches, his career should not falter in the face of fury."I don't have to chase the guy around," he said. "At the same time I need to manage how he comes forward. We've got a fight plan in place to deal with that. He can make any good fighter look average. I'm fully prepared for whatever he brings. It was time to get back into it. I couldn't wait any longer."

​- © Fairfax NZ News

Minto has plenty to fight for against Cameron

LIAM NAPIER



They don't come any more blue collar than Brian Minto.The self-confessed American spoiler couldn't be further from glamorous, but everything about his personality and motivations suggest Shane Cameron is set for a bloody brawl on Saturday night.Minto's first sporting love was American football. He adopted the pugilistic art during an 18-fight amateur career, while playing inside linebacker and running back at college in the rust belt state of Pennsylvania.The small town of Butler, situated one hour north of Pittsburgh, has and always will be home. Like Cameron, Minto was a late boxing bloomer, turning pro at 28.There had to be more to life than stringing television cable, or working as a mason tender - laying brick and block. If you never take a chance in life you're never going to be successful at anything, he figured.The gamble paid off. It could be much worse than being paid to travel the world and forge a respectable 38-7 record."I took a chance. I fought a professional fight for some extra money. I didn't really know what was going to happen," Minto says with a strong East Coast accent.My wife wasn't happy about it. It's been a good living for me. At the end of the day you've got bills to pay and kids to feed.

I know what it's like to be on the other side. That's why I put a lot of work into boxing throughout the years."From an early age, during playground scraps, Minto knew he had heart. Being an undersized heavyweight, it's possibly his greatest asset. He's been down but also gets back up.  All fighters harness unique motivators.For Minto, that's his family. Daughter Megan, 13, and son Mathew, 11, who is on the autism spectrum, need his career to prosper."It's tough with him," Minto says of his son. "His social skills and behaviours are bad, but there are kids that don't even communicate. It's hard for my wife at home and when I'm there. Being gone it puts a lot of stress on her. She's a good woman and has struck with me through everything."Auckland is a different venue; the challenge is the same. Minto is, again, on the outer. Yesterday the visitor spoke of his best triumph, knocking out German Axel Schulz (26-5) in-front of 15,000 foreigners. He is embracing this similar challenge.It's fitting Minto must plot his own future. He's never had a promoter to sell his talents and won't need one if he can pull off an upset over Cameron.   

"Being the spoiler motivates me," he says. "It's not a glamorous term but I see the writing on the wall as far as coming to another country. I'm not the favourite. I'm not going to get any favours decision wise. I've never had a promoter. I've always fought on phone calls. Every time I'm brought in to lose. This is my job and this opportunity is very good."The focus of this fight is squarely on Cameron's comeback.For both fighters, though, one punch can change everything.

- © Fairfax NZ News


Beast of a brawl looms in Fight headline bout
LIAM NAPIER

They don't come any more blue collar than Brian Minto.The self-confessed American spoiler couldn't be further from glamorous, but everything about his personality and motivations suggest Shane Cameron is set for a bloody brawl on Saturday night.Minto's first sporting love was American football. He grew fond of the pugilistic art during an 18-fight amateur career, while playing inside linebacker and running back at college in the rust-belt state of Pennsylvania. The small town of Butler, situated one hour north of Pittsburgh, has and always will be home.

Like Cameron, Minto - whose ring name is "The Beast" - was a boxing late-bloomer, turning pro at 28.There had to be more to life than stringing television cable, or working as a mason tender - laying brick and block. If you never take a chance in life you're never going to be successful at anything, he figured.The gamble paid off. It could be much worse than being paid to travel the world and forge a respectable 38-7 record."I took a chance. I fought a professional fight for some extra money. I didn't really know what was going to happen," Minto says with a strong East Coast accent."My wife wasn't happy about it. It's been a good living for me. At the end of the day you've got bills to pay and kids to feed. I know what it's like to be on the other side. That's why I put a lot of work into boxing throughout the years."From an early age, during playground scraps, Minto knew he had heart. Being an undersized heavyweight, it's possibly his greatest asset.

He's been down but also gets back up.All fighters harness unique motivations.For Minto, that's his family. Daughter Megan, 13, and son Mathew, 11, who is on the spectrum of autism, need his career to prosper."It's tough with him," Minto says of his son. "His social skills and behaviours are bad, but there are kids that don't even communicate. It's hard for my wife at home and when I'm there. Being gone, it puts a lot of stress on her. She's a good woman and has stuck with me through everything."Auckland is a different venue; the challenge is the same. Minto is, again, on the outer. Yesterday the visitor spoke of his best triumph, knocking out German Axel Schulz (26-5) in-front of 15,000 foreigners. He is embracing this similar challenge.It's fitting Minto must plot his own future. He's never had a promoter to sell his talents, and won't need one if he can pull off an upset over Cameron."Being the spoiler motivates me," he says. "It's not a glamorous term but I see the writing on the wall as far as coming to another country. I'm not the favourite. I'm not going to get any favours decision-wise. I've never had a promoter. I've always fought on phone calls. Every time I'm brought in to lose. This is my job and this opportunity is very good."The focus of this fight is squarely on Cameron's comeback.For both fighters, though, one punch can change everything.

- © Fairfax NZ News


Busy schedule plays into Minto's hands
American Brian Minto is convinced he will have the edge on Kiwi hope Shane Cameron in his Fight for Life encounter on Saturday night.Minto's confidence is high. While Cameron has been inactive for 388 days, he has fought six times in the same time frame."When the lights go on and you are alone in the ring with your opponent, you are as far away from sparring sessions as you can get," Minto said."When you haven't fought for so long, it can play on your mind. And when you have things on your mind in the ring other than what's happening in front of you, pressure builds."And pressure bursts pipes."Cameron, of course, is unconcerned about his time out of the ring following his cruiserweight loss to Danny Green last November.Indeed, he is in a buoyant mood, because for the first time since his devastating win against Monte Barrett 17 months ago, he is fighting at his natural weight, after three years of switching between the cruiserweight and heavyweight divisions.

"Being out of the ring for a year isn't going to be a factor," Cameron said, ahead of the WBO Oriental heavyweight title fight."What is a factor is that I am going in at my natural weight. I haven't tried to get bigger and I haven't had to try to get smaller, so I am comfortable."And when I am comfortable, I'm dangerous."While Cameron and Minto are the headline act at Auckland's Trusts Arena, there will be just as much interest in the undercard.The pick of those bouts is the clash between All Black Liam Messam, and Cronulla and New South Wales skipper Paul Gallen.Both have previous Fight for Life experience - Messam defeated Wendell Sailor in 2011, while Gallen accounted for former All Black Hika Elliott last year.Elliott, who has sparred with Messam through their mutual links at the Chiefs' Super 15 franchise, is tipping the All Blacks flanker to get the "W" at the weekend."Liam is pretty sharp in the ring." Elliott said.

"It's going to be a pretty good match-up, but Liam is more skillful, so I think he will come out on top."The other "rugby v league" clash sees another Chief - prop Ben Tameifuna - match up with Brisbane, Queensland and Kangaroos talisman Sam Thaiday."Big Ben", who won a Super 15 rugby title with Messam earlier this year, will have a massive weight advantage over Thaiday. The Kiwi tips the scales at about 140kg, compared to Thaiday's 115kg.Reports of Tameifuna's power have reached the Kangaroo. Tameifuna broke the jaw of a sparring partner last week."I didn't realize I was that strong," Tameifuna said.
-One Source

Minto-Cameron Press ConferenceBy Ray Wheatley — World of Boxing


​​

The Press Conference was held for the vacant WBO Oriental Heavyweight championship contest between Shane” Mountain Warrior” Cameron (29-3, 22 KOs) of New Zealand and Brian “The Beast” Minto (38-7, 24 KO’s) of Butler, Pennsylvania, USA, to be staged at The Trust Stadium, Auckland, New Zealand on Saturday promoted by Dean Lonergan (Duco Events). Matchmaker Stuart Duncan. In attendance were Ken Reinsfeld who trains Shane Cameron and Kevin Barry who trains Brian Minto.Cameron is coming off a twelve round points loss to IBO cruiserweight champion Danny Green and Minto coming off a semi-final loss to Michael Sprott in the Prizefighter tournament in London.

Cameron, Minto size each other up for all-action clash
JONATHAN MCKEOWN


Ahead of Fight for Life, American heavyweight Brian Minto says all the pressure is on Shane Cameron, yet the Mountain Warrior simply shrugs his sizable shoulders and welcomes it with a smile.Cameron makes his return to the heavyweight division on Saturday when he takes on "The Beast" Minto for the WBO Oriental Heavyweight Title in the Woodstock Fight for Life's main event.The pair were in Nelson yesterday to promote the fight in somewhat rare circumstances. The fighters were seen making small talk while waiting to collect luggage, something Cameron conceded would "never happen" with an opponent like Monte Barrett."It's a first for me being on tour with an opponent, but he is actually quite a nice bloke, a real professional," said Cameron. "But come fight night you put all that aside."Many pundits are picking the bout to be an all-action fight - for as long as it lasts - with both fighters using a similar style. But, on a night where Kiwi pride is on the line in the rugby versus league battles featuring All Blacks, Kangaroos and former Black Caps, Minto a 38-year old American, said he was happy to play "the spoiler'."I'm very surprised they picked a guy like me in their comeback fight," said Minto."I have no pressure on me. 

This isn't my country, these aren't my people, so I am ready to be the spoiler and take people's dreams and aspirations, because I am shooting for the same goals."The experienced Minto has a record of 38-7 and will pose a threat for Cameron, especially when fighting on the inside. Minto fought just three weeks ago in the England-based Prizefighter tournament.Kevin Barry, Minto's guest trainer for this fight, added more fuel to the fire saying if Minto could get the job done "the money only goes up" and the American will be lined up for another two fights in New Zealand.Barry said fight promoters Duco Event have outlined that if Minto defeated Cameron he would fight on the Joseph Parker undercard in Nelson in March and he would fight Joseph Parker in June or July.Barry said that incentive would ensure "we are going to see the very best that Brian Minto has to offer" plus a war in the ring."Both guys are battle-tested, both guys are hardened fighters," said Barry. "Styles make fights and this look like a real barn burner."Although Minto is plotting to step over Cameron and take the Kiwi's opportunities, he said it was just the fight game."We are professionals and there is no animosity between us, but when the bell rings, that goes out the window," said Minto.

"I think we are going to test each other's wills and when push comes to shove we will be right in the middle of the ring banging."Despite not fighting since his world title IBO cruiserweight loss to three-time world champion Danny Green in November last year, Cameron remains quietly confident.The calm demeanour is almost unsettling. The slight smirk when discussing the time away from the ring makes it seem like a ploy to lull his opponent into a false confidence. Although that is typically not the way Cameron operates."Nope, no mind games from me," he said when sitting alongside his similarly frank and uncomplicated trainer Henry Schuster. "I don't play the mind games, I just know I have the firepower to do the job."Cameron said he started sparring early to help get "boxing fit" again. He will fight at his natural weight of around 100kg, where he feels near "mobile and strong". It is around the same weight Cameron was when he fought Monte Barrett in July 2012. A tree-trunk right hand, with both feet rooted to the floor, felled Barret in the fourth round that night, and Cameron reckons there could be something similar in store on Saturday."I think there is going to be some fireworks," said Cameron.

"Whether it is in the first round or halfway through the fight. It could be the first 10 seconds."The Minto-Cameron matchup will unfold after an undercard full of stars collide for the charity event supporting KidsCan.All Blacks' hard-man Liam Messam will take on his Australian rugby league counterpart Paul Gallen while fellow Kangeroo Sam Thaiday will take on immovable Chiefs prop Ben Tameifuna, who tips the scales at 140kg.Also on the undercard is embattled New Zealand cricketer Chris Cairns, though if the former Black Caps all-rounder has it his way, his opponent and friend Simon Doull will be the one on the defensive.

- © Fairfax NZ News


Odd buildup for Shane Cameron, Brian Minto

TOBY ROBSON


These are awkward times for Kiwi boxer Shane Cameron and his American opponent Brian Minto.An obligatory eye-ball and a dash of trash talk at the weigh-in is one thing, travelling together on a week-long promotional tour of New Zealand is another."He's not that happy about it, I'm not either, but it's all part and parcel of the game," Cameron said during a whistlestop in Wellington yesterday."We don't go out for dinner or eat together even though we are travelling together. We travel in different cars, we don't sit next to each other on the plane."But you get to certain points of the day where you end up standing next to each other and he's quite a nice bloke, so we talk."And that's where it's a bit awkward for a couple of blokes who will try to knock each other out during the main bout of Saturday's Fight for Life in Auckland."Most of the guys I've fought are are probably nice guys, but you just see them at the weigh-in, stare into their eyes and see them in the ring."With Brian I've got to know the guy a bit more. 



You aren't going to just stand there and not say anything for days on end."He's got a family same as me, so you talk about the family and you have similar interests. We're both fighters."But I know and he knows when that bell goes it's a totally different story."Minto shares similar feelings, but said the small talk was coming to a natural end."You could see today we are getting a bit more distant. I'm not trying to be buddy-buddy, but at the same time I'm saying hey to him. It's not personal, it's just business, that's all," the 38-year-old father of two said."He's trying to take food out of my kid's mouth, that's only going to make me fight harder. I punch with bad intentions because I know I can't leave it up to the judges over here ... I have to bring my own judges and that's these fists right here."Both men are desperate to extend their records - Cameron (29-3) and Minto (38-7) - with their professional careers at a crossroads.

New Zealand trainer Kevin Barry is in Minto's corner and has been busily trying to boost his man's confidence levels.Barry painted Cameron as an uncertain fighter who has lost his way in bouncing between the cruiserweight and heavyweight divisions.He said Minto was more active with six fights this year, while Cameron had fought twice over two years and was worn out by a grinding career."Shane's boxed 12 rounds 17 times, which is absolutely unheard of ... it's not the 12 rounds on fight day, it's the hundreds if not thousands of rounds of sparring to get ready."That takes a toll on your body. He's had problems with his hands, cuts, the pressure is on in this fight. I think we've got Shane in a bit of a quandary mentally."Of course Barry has ulterior motives. He wants Cameron to fight Joseph Parker and will no doubt push for it post-fight, regardless of the result.There's more chance of a lucrative Cameron-Parker showdown if the former loses. Otherwise why would Cameron take a risk on the young buck?Whatever the case, Cameron doesn't plan to lose.

Though he lost to Green last November, his last heavyweight fight was possibly his best, a spectacular knockout of Monte Barrett.And Cameron has a different spin on his sortie into the cruiserweight ranks.He doesn't regret taking the world title fight, but said dropping 12kg to 88.5kg to fight Green was too big an ask and took its toll during the 12-round battle.The upside was that as he put the weight back on he realised he'd spent much of his career trying to carry too many kilos."This is only the second time I will fight at my natural weight. The first time was when I beat Barrett."Up until then I thought bigger was better, so I was eating like an animal to maintain the weight."Cameron will be about 99kg come weigh-in and believes he can repeat the performance that sent Barrett reeling.

- © Fairfax NZ News

​Cameron battling 'ring rust' in comeback

Shane Cameron faces off against Brian Minto (Source: Photosport)
He may have not fought for nearly a year, but boxer Shane Cameron insists he will be ready for his upcoming heavyweight bout against American Brian Minto.Cameron has returned to boxing's most celebrated division, after his failed IBO cruiserweight title bid against Danny Green last year and this fight represents a chance for the Mountain Warrior to reaffirm his heavyweight credentials."I feel good," Cameron told ONE Sport. 

"I have been training for quite a while and I have been back boxing for quite a while."I knew there was going to be a fight coming up in the pipeline at the end of the year, so I started well before an opponent was even announced."Before I even knew it was a 12-rounder, I had started sparring. I have got rid of the rust, so I just need to get punch fit now"Minto has a credible record (38-7) and should pose a genuine threat to Cameron (29-3).Both fighters throw plenty of punches and don't mind taking a blow, so there is reasonable chance that a knockout could end this contest before the scheduled 12 rounds.And Minto, 38, believes he will have an edge, having just come from competing in a tournament in London, which pits American and British fighters against each other.

"There is a thing called ring rust," said Minto. "People can say they have been sparring and training, but it is different when you can get the 10 ounces on under the lights."Helping Minto's preparations is well-known New Zealand trainer Kevin Barry.Barry was approached by Minto's manager to help with the American's final preparations, but he says he will only make subtle adjustments."You can't make big changes in a couple of weeks, especially with a 38-year-old fighter, but I will make some small changes, and hopefully we can make Brian a more competitive and better fighter on fight night," Barry said.Meanwhile, All Blacks Liam Messam and Piri Weepu, Chiefs prop Ben Tameifuna, and Australian league players Paul Gallen and Sam Thaiday are all expected to feature on the undercard of the charity event.
- ONE Sport

Top American to test Shane Cameron's ring rust
LIAM NAPIER


After one year out of the ring, Shane Cameron will launch his comeback and headline next month's Fight for Life against Brian Minto.The experienced American heavyweight (38-7) is a credible opponent and should pose a genuine test for Cameron (29-3) ahead of what he hopes will be the final defining two years of his career.Before securing Minto, the Sunday Star-Times understands Fight for Life promoters Duco Events chased undefeated Ukrainian Andriy Rudenko (24-0). He priced himself out of the market, demanding a $150,000 purse.Coming off an IBO cruiserweight world title loss to three-time world champion Danny Green last year, Cameron is determined to make a statement in his return to the heavyweight division. 

There he feels most comfortable and doesn't have to lose more than 10kg from his natural weight.Pennsylvania-based Minto should provide that opportunity. Cameron will hold a slight height (eight centimetres) and reach (four cm) advantage.But styles make fights the public want to see.There will be no surprises when these two square off. It will be an intriguing clash that should produce a stand-and-deliver, blood-and-guts war. Neither fighter is known for finesse. Both come forward, take plenty of shots and are, therefore, regarded as tough competitors.All that adds up to a fight which could end with a knockout blow.After a 12 month rest period, Cameron feels refreshed. The 36-year-old started sparring four weeks ago to get his eye in under the guidance of trainer Henry Schuster, who linked belatedly with David Tua in his career-ending defeat to Alexander Ustinov last week.

Cameron realises this is his last crack at mounting a charge for a heavyweight world crown.Minto - dubbed "The Beast" - has plotted a similar path to Cameron. A natural heavyweight, he dropped to cruiserweight for a shot at the WBO title in 2010, but lost to German Marco Huck. His other big-name fight was against American contender Chris Arreola in 2009, when he suffered a fourth-round TKO.The 38-year-old comes off mixed form in this month's England-based Prizefighter tournament, which pits American and UK fighters against each other.All Blacks Liam Messam and Piri Weepu will also line up on the undercard of the charity event.

- © Fairfax NZ News

​Minto calls on Barry to plot Cameron's downfall

LOGAN SAVORY



American Brian Minto has called on Kevin Barry to try to plot the downfall of Kiwi heavyweight boxer Shane Cameron next month.Minto arrived in New Zealand yesterday morning as he eyes a date with Cameron in the ring on December 14 in Auckland. The Cameron-Minto clash is the main event on the Fight for Life card.With the 38-year-old American as he got off the plane in Auckland yesterday was Las Vegas-based Kiwi trainer Barry.Minto's manager Pat Nelson last week approached Barry about the prospect of putting the final touches on Minto's leadup to the Cameron fight and to also be in his corner on fight night.

The 1982 Olympic silver medallist, who currently trains New Zealand's rising heavyweight star Joseph Parker, originally said no to the idea.Barry had Parker in camp in Las Vegas with their latest training block scheduled to run through to December 6.However after talking with Parker Barry decided he would in fact prepare Minto and also train Parker in Auckland over the next couple of weeks.Parker will not stay with family but instead stay in the same hotel as Barry and Minto and train exactly like he has been in Las Vegas."He said go for it," Barry said of Parker's response."He was happy with it provided we stayed together and trained three times a day like we have been in Las Vegas. He was happy to finish the last three weeks of the training camp in New Zealand.

"The ironic thing about Barry taking on the role of training Minto for the Cameron fight is that a Cameron-Parker New Zealand heavyweight showdown looks almost certain to happen in the next 12 months as well.And if Minto was to beat Cameron then Minto could become a possible opponent for Parker next year.Barry acknowledged everything was pointing to a Cameron-Parker stoush and agreed he would get a good look at Cameron through his role as Minto's trainer over the next few weeks."I'm not going to get a better look at (Cameron) am I," he said yesterday on his arrival to New Zealand."Look I think a Joseph Parker-Shane Cameron fight is inevitable but at the moment Joseph's got a fight coming up on March 22 in Nelson and Cameron has got Minto to contend with.

"Barry said the Cameron-Minto fight shaped up to be an exciting fight given both fighters were similar in stature and liked to come forward and trade punches - unlike the lacklustre David Tua-Alexander Ustinov fight that played out in Hamilton recently.He said Cameron and Minto also were very similar in many other areas including age and experience and for both they need wins to keep their career going."On paper I think this is going to be a really good fight for the boxing fans."He said it was limited in what changes he could make with Minto in such a short space of time with him but his role was about assessing "fight styles" and in particular how Minto can beat Cameron.

​- © Fairfax NZ News



Boxing: Minto-Cameron fight gives coach head start on planning


The main event at next month's Fight for Life is set to become a reconnaisance mission with the revelation boxing coach Kevin Barry will train Brian Minto in the weeks leading up to his bout with Shane Cameron.Barry, whose main focus is developing New Zealand boxing hopeful Joseph Parker, met 45-fight veteran Minto, aka The Beast, for the first time yesterday. The pair didn't waste any time getting down to business."He looks strong, he looks in shape," Barry said.Barry says his decision to train Minto was made easier by the fact he is fighting Cameron.


"Brian rang me last week and I liked what he was saying. He told me that he had just fought a week ago in London at the Prizefighter tournament where he made it to the semifinals."I liked the fact he had just fought and he said he thought Shane Cameron was a good fight for him."The bout will give Barry a head start in preparations for a possible Cameron-Parker fight next year."When I began working with Joseph after the Botha fight we put together a plan.

I looked at a lot of different styles and a lot of different fighters. One of those was Brian Minto, so it was just funny the way this worked out."Barry sees this fight as a stepping stone for both Minto, 38, and Cameron, 36. However, the underlying focus remains clear."We've made no secret to the fact that we would like a Parker-Cameron fight some time next year."I sat Joseph down with me and said to him I'd been given this opportunity and would you be interested if we took this training camp back to New Zealand for the last few weeks?"He said as long as I'm working with you and we're training three times a day, I'm fine with it.

"With the Minto-Cameron fight scheduled to take place on December 14, Barry says he will offer Minto his full support, "but I'm not going to make big changes to his style".This is Barry's first time involved with the Fight for Life and he believes the bout has the makings of a classic."Both guys like to fight, both guys like to trade punches and both guys like to come forward," Barry said. "This is a fight that boxing fans will want to see."

By Josh Berry


Boxing: Minto a tough proposition
By Paul Lewis



Tough, brawling US heavyweight Brian Minto (known as "the Beast") will be Shane Cameron's opponent at the top of the Fight For Life card next month - a boxer who has taken on some top contenders.The 38-year-old Minto will be a difficult opponent for Cameron, 36, who has not fought for a year since his world IBO cruiserweight title fight in Australia, where he lost to Danny Green.There is also a lot hanging on this fight for Cameron, who becomes New Zealand boxing's senior pro with the retirement of David Tua. The money-making potential of a bout between Cameron and rising heavyweight star Joseph Parker has been lost on no one and, if Cameron loses against Minto, his box office appeal will significantly reduce.Minto, like Cameron, is at the smaller end of the heavyweight scales and, also like Cameron, has flipped between the heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions.Cameron has since said he finds it difficult to get under the 90kg cruiserweight limit and wants to fight as a heavyweight - and was looking for someone credible to announce his return to the ring.

He's found that in Minto, whose best-known scalp was that of Axel Schultz, the well-performed German heavyweight who fought world champions in George Foreman, Michael Moorer, Wladimir Klitschko and Lennox Lewis' world title challenger, Henry Akinwande. Schultz was 38 at the time and had been out of the ring for seven years following his loss to Klitchsko - and a strong performance and TKO by Minto sent him immediately back into retirement.However, that was 2006 and Minto has lost five of his last eight fights, some to credentialled boxers. One of those defeats was to serious heavyweight contender Chris Arreola (who fought Vitali Klitschko for the WBC world title in 2009, immediately before his bout with Minto - and he is still a prospect for a bout with brother Wladimir, who holds all the other major world titles). Another defeat was to 29-year-old WBO world cruiserweight champion Marco Huck.

A third loss was to UK journeyman Michael Sprott who nonetheless has been in the ring with heavyweight contenders like Robert Helenius (Sweden) and Kubrat Pulev (Bulgaria).On bare statistics, it looks like Minto is at a bit of a crossroads in his career and needs a win. Cameron, until his loss to Green, was beginning to figure higher in the rankings with his win over Tua conqueror Monte Barrett. Altogether, Minto has had 45 fights for 38 wins (21 by knockout) and seven losses. Cameron (1.88m, 90kg) and Minto (1.80m, 100kg) have similar, all-action, trading blows styles."Shane Cameron is tough - but I am tougher," said Minto. "I'm fighting away from home and I don't intend to leave it up to the judges. Danny Green couldn't put him away and I would spank Danny's arse if he ever had the courage to face me."Cameron said: "I know what I am up against. The media tagged Minto as 'the Beast' early in his career - fitting because of his brawling walk forward, stand and trade style."Yes, I have my work cut out for me and I am preparing for a long, hard battle but I am confident I have his measure.

"There is little doubt that Parker is waiting in the wings. Promoters Duco worked with Cameron's connections to find an opponent for Fight For Life; they also handle Parker.The title of New Zealand's best heavyweight will be attractive to both fighters now Tua is gone and Parker's next opponent in March, Brazilian and South American heavyweight champion George Arias, seems tailor-made as a warm-up for Cameron. Like Cameron, the Brazilian is a durable opponent, he's 39, 1.81m and about 100kg - a boxer of similar dimensions.The Cameron-Minto bout and the rest of the Fight For Life card is scheduled to take place on December 14.

​- Herald on Sunday


Shane Cameron to face Brian Minto on Dec 14
By Brett Bonetti


Shane “The Mountain Warrior” Cameron (29-3, 22 KOs) will return to ring to face American Brian “The Beast” Minto (38-7, 24 KOs) in the main event of the ” Woodstock Fight for Life” card on Saturday December 14 at The Trusts Arena, Auckland, New Zealand. Cameron is looking to once again make an impact in the heavyweight division as Minto believes Cameron’s ‘Ring Rust’ will work in his favour, as by the time this bout takes place, Cameron would have been officially out of the ring for 388 days.“Shane is a fighter I respect, but that would worry me,” Minto said. “It’s all very well talking about knocking me out but I haven’t been out of the ring for a year like Shane. That is bound to play on his mind when the bell goes. 

You can say you are sparring great in the gym but, trust me, it is different once you get under those lights and you get those ten ounce gloves on. When you have been off so long, there are a lot of unanswered questions.”Minto has fought six times in the last two years while Cameron has only fought twice. Cameron was last in the ring against Danny Green in November 2012.Minto’s trainer Kevin Barry is not underestimating the danger than Cameron will bring although he is surprised Cameron has agreed to fight Minto in his first fight back.“This is a tougher fight than I thought Shane would want to come back on,” Barry said. “That tells me that Shane is very serious about what he wants to achieve, but, hey, it’s a tough fight to fight when you have been out of the ring for a year.

Both guys like to fight, both like to trade punches and both like to come forward. I’ll be surprised if someone isn’t knocked out,” Barry said.Cameron’s manager Ken Reinsfield said, “While it’s true Shane has not been in the ring for a year he has never stopped training, he is always in shape and I believe he will have too much for Brian Minto. Shane is a warrior, he has KO’d opponents while nursing a broken hand, he was won, and lost, bruised and bloodied, he has been ‘retired’ by scribes after loses but has comeback and surprised the nay-sayers time after time.”The Mountain Warrior was last at heavyweight in July 2012 where he had a sensational knock out of American Monte Barrett which was a contender for 2012 knockout of the year.“I feel strong and I know what I can do in the heavyweight division, and Brian is going to find out the hard way on December 14,” Cameron said.The Woodstock Fight for Life card will also feature an all-star cast of rugby and league internationals.All Blacks hero Liam Messam leads a rugby team which boasts the likes of Chiefs prop ‘Big’ Ben Tameifuna while Kangaroos and NSW hardman Paul Gallen oversees a crew which includes Broncos and Queensland great Sam Thaiday.

Follow Brett Bonetti on Twitter @brettbonetti